Deceptive Trade Practice Laws

Deceptive trade practice is an activity in which an individual or business engages that is likely to mislead or lure the public into purchasing a product or service.  False advertising and odometer tampering are two examples of deceptive trade practice.  Deceptive trade practices are given special status as offenses against the general public.  It is accorded by law of special enforcement status.

Deceptive trade practices result in criminal prosecution in some states.  In some other states, statutes provide for private enforcement, whereby a citizen is entitled to sue a business for violating deceptive trade practice laws.  The person may be able to recover punitive damages and/or statutory fines.  Moreover, the attorney general of the state may bring a lawsuit against an offending business enterprise.

A number of states have adopted the standardized Uniform Deceptive Trade Practices Act (UDTPA).  The Uniform Act does not add or detract from the law of any one state.  It covers almost all the prohibitions and issues addressed in state laws.  The states that have not adopted the UDTPA have similar other laws.


Inside Deceptive Trade Practice Laws